Miso Power

Hemp Heart Miso
ready to get packed down and aged.
Made with a sweet white miso base of rice koji using Aspergillus oryzae,
the type most commonly used for mellow and quicker misos.

The beginnings of a miso. Through a choreographed interaction between yeasts, bacteria and fungus – typically referred to as fermentation – this mash up of koji and the hearts of hemp seeds becomes an all purpose probiotic rich seasoning agent.

Some claim miso has therapeutic effects, so they never add it to anything above 140F degrees which might inactivate the benefits. We’ll get into the heavy healing and science part of miso and koji later.

Miso can easily be used to cook with, sometimes replacing or augmenting vegetable or animal stocks. We’re in it for the taste. There is no shortage of prebiotic and probiotic foods unless everything you eat is heavily processed and pasteurized.

You can’t make miso, soy sauce, sake, a lot of different types of pickles, a country style alcoholic drink called doboroku, or a useful enzyme rich drink (and sweetener) called amasake without koji.

You can make your own koji. We’ll show you how to make different types of koji from a range of different things. The things you make koji on are often called substrates. Wheat, rice, barley, corn, rye, buckwheat, millet, beans of all types and other substrates.

Is it worth your time and energy when you can pretty easily buy koji online, or in a growing number of grocery stores and markets? Some people can’t get beyond the fact that they are intentionally growing a fungus. a specific type of fungus called a mold on warm grains.

Growing koji, however, creates a truly seductive, fragrant fuzz on freshly steamed rice, barley, beans or potatoes that is hard to forget. You can start off by justing buying a good quality miso from the store though. The best ones are unpasteurized ad definitely don’t contain any chemicals nor preservatives.

It’s almost impossible to get around eating anything that doesn’t contain microbes such as yeasts, bacteria, or fungus. Typically salt is introduced to kill off the bad actors and create lactic acid bacteria (LAB) so the process can continue safely. Not that anyone has ever recorded a case of someone dying from eating miso.

Don’t forget there are two exciting Meetups coming up to attend, one in Long Island City at Fifth Hammer Brewing of the group NYCferments, the other our first collaborative event with www.apexart.com in Manhattan. It’s the first of a series called Koji Fest 2019. Apexart is currently running an amazing installation.

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